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Change Terminal Color Mac

Change Terminal Color Mac
Did you know Mac OS X Terminal actually comes with pre-defined profile colors you can choose from? In addition, you can change any of the pre-built colors to be any other color you want.   1. Open Terminal go to Terminal Menu -> Preferences and choose Profiles.  2. Choose a color style profile of your choice. We like Homebrew. You can customize the color of Terminal background, text, bold text, selection, and cursor.   3. When you select a new profile, click “Default” at the bottom to apply the new profile. 4. Restart Terminal for changes to take effect.

Mac Install Old Java Version

Mac Install Old Java Version
Mac X Aqua Applications developed with an older version of Java will require you to install and use the Java 6 Runtime that is now end of life and no longer updated. Below is a direct link to install the Java 6 Runtime for for OS X 10.11 El Capitan, OS X 10.10 Yosemite, OS X 10.9 Mavericks, OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, and OS X 10.7 Lion.   Install Java for OS X 2015-001 here. And for older versions… Install Java for OS X 2014-001 here.

Mac Change System Font

Mac Change System Font
Some of us like to control everything on our Mac. Now you can change the default system font of your Mac OS system by following these steps.   1. Determine the font you want to change your Mac system font to. In this example, we will be using SF Archery Black font. For reference, you can view the following font files currently installed on your Mac in the locations provided below. Also, a great free front website is FontSquirrel. You will need a .TTF font file for this guide.   Mac OS X Font Folder Locations: USER -> Library-> FontsHard Drive -> Library -> FontsHard Drive -> System -> Library -> Fonts 2. Copy the font your using to your Desktop. In the example, we copied SF Archery Black font to...

Install Incompatible iOS Apps

Install Incompatible iOS Apps
Are you trying to install an iOS App on an unsupported iOS version on your iPad or iPhone? Several first and second generation Apple products have iOS version limitations. For example, the iPad 2 is only able to install iOS version 5.1.1. This is frustrating especially if you don’t plan to purchase new hardware to support the latest apps. Today, there are several iOS Apps that require a minimum of iOS 7.0 or higher to work. Luckily, there is a slick way to edit the core files of an unsupported app and “trick” the app to thinking your iDevice is using the required iOS version.   1. Download the App from iTunes you want installed on your device. The quickest way is to Open iTunes -> Select Apps from Top Left...
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